Mount Athos

Mount Athos is a mountain and peninsula in northeastern Greece and an important centre of Eastern Orthodox monasticism. It is governed as an autonomous polity within the Greek Republic. Mount Athos is home to 20 monasteries under the direct jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople.

Mount Athos is commonly referred to in Greek as the "Holy Mountain" (Ἅγιον Ὄρος) and the entity as the "Athonite State" (Αθωνική Πολιτεία, Athoniki Politia). Other languages of Orthodox tradition also use names translating to "Holy Mountain". In the classical era, while the mountain was called Athos, the peninsula was known as Acté or Akté (Ἀκτή).

Samothraki

Samothraki is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea. It is a municipality within the Evros regional unit of Thrace. The island is 17 km (11 mi) long and is 178 km2 (69 sq mi) in size and has a population of 2,859 (2011 census). Its main industries are fishing and tourism. Resources on the island include granite and basalt. Samothrace is one of the most rugged Greek islands, with Mt. Saos and its tip Fengari rising to 1,611 m (5,285 ft).

Samothrace was not a state of any political significance in ancient Greece, since it has no natural harbour and most of the island is too mountainous for cultivation: Mount Fengari (literally 'Mt. Moon') rises to 1,611 m (5,285 ft). It was, however, the home of the Sanctuary of the Great Gods, site of important Hellenic and pre-Hellenic religious ceremonies. Among those who visited this shrine to be initiated into the island cult were Lysander of Sparta, Philip II of Macedon and Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, father-in-law of Julius Caesar.

Alimos

Alimos is a municipality in South Athens, Greece. It was formed in 1968 comprising two settlements, the suburban seaside town of Kalamaki (Greek: Καλαμάκι), and the inland community of Trachones (Greek: Τράχωνες). Alimos had 41,720 inhabitants in the 2011 census. Alimos is situated on the Saronic Gulf coast, 8 km south of Athens city centre. The municipality has an area of 5.909 km2.

The Hellinikon Olympic Complex, built on the grounds of the former Ellinikon International Airport for the 2004 Summer Olympics, lies south of Alimos. The built-up area of Alimos is continuous with those of the neighbouring suburbs Palaio Faliro, Agios Dimitrios, Ilioupoli, Argyroupoli and Elliniko. Alimos has a large marina and several beaches.

The main roads of Alimos are Poseidonos Avenue along the coast, Kalamakiou Avenue and Alimou Avenue. The nearest subway station is at Alimos metro station, in the eastern part of the municipality.

Thassos - Limenaria

This lovely village is located on the island's south-west coast and forms a community together with the neighbouring settlement of Kalivia. Limenaria has a beautiful harbour and offers absolutely gorgeous views of the Aegean Sea and the holy mountain, Mount Athos.

Limenaria is in an area which has one of the mildest climates on the island, and it has become a very popular destination for holidaymakers. It has retained its unique local culture and many Greek traditions. Visitors can enjoy a wide choice of tavernas and restaurant, serving local Greek dishes, and many of these restaurants are located adjacent to the sea, all along the coastline of the town. There are also to be found numerous cafés, bars, shops and kiosks all providing a very wide range of necessities and souvenirs. All of the facilities are within walking distance, and it is a very pleasant environment to walk around, and absorb the simplicity of this way of life which hasn't changed for many, many years.

Thassos - Limenas

Limenas quite simply means "the port". It is the capital of the island and is commonly called "Thassos Town". It's the home of the main harbour from which you can easily travel to and from mainland Greece via the ferry port of Keramoti.

The village offers a wide variety of attractions and activities, many more than can be undertaken in one short holiday! It is in the northerly part of the island, surrounded by the densely wooded pine green mountains, and large swathes of olive groves, making the whole a very picturesque setting.

It is just a short distance from mainland Greece, where the city of Kavala can be clearly seen, both during the daytime and at the night-time when it is wonderful to watch the lights of the town and of the villages around. From Limenas one can enjoy spectacular sunsets, as the sun dips behind the mountains, while enjoying a cool drink in the evening warmth.

Thassos - Alyki

Alyki is a breath-taking peninsula leading out steeply into the sea and forming two beautiful coves on the south-east coast of the island. The settlement of Alyki has a history which can be traced back, uninterrupted, to the 7th century B.C.

Alyki translates literally as “the salt pans” (throughout the salt marshes), but this strikingly beautiful small fishing hamlet is world renowned for its antiquities and for the beautifully preserved and well presented demonstrations of how quarrying and shipping the local Thassian marble was undertaken during ancient times.

The ancient quarry is located on the most southeastern point of the Cape itself. Nearby there are two temples which are located inside the holy rocks Northeast of the cove, carved into the rocks themselves - where the faithful placed their votive offerings. Between these two points, the quarry and the temples, there is a natural stretch of high ground which was used in the 12th century before Christ as a transportation and commercial centre. It enabled the transport of marble and marble products by sea, and it functioned throughout the Greek, Roman and Byzantine empires, right up until the seventh century A.D. when the raids and the invasions from the North began.

Ierissos

Achantus, near mount Athos, was an Ancient Greek city in the Roman province of Macedonia Prima (civil diocese of Macedonia)) During the Byzantine era Erissos was the seat of a bishopric, evidenced from 883 (see below). From the 10th century onwards, the town's history is indissolubly linked with that of Mount Athos. In 942 there were disputes between Ierissos and the monks of Mount Athos over the borders between Ierissos and the monastic community's lands and, the following year, the differences were settled in person by a large commission of major politicians and church officials.

In the summer of 1425, Ierissos came into the hands of the Turks. During that time the Venetians, starting from Cassandreia, landed on the coastline of Ierissos, burnt down the settlement (by then only a large village) and its surroundings and (on departure) set alight the castle and five towers. Under Ottoman rule, Ierissos was one of the privileged Mademochoria.

Keramoti

Keramoti is a town and a former municipality in the Kavala regional unit, East Macedonia and Thrace, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Nestos, of which it is a municipal unit.The municipal unit has an area of 115.095 km2. As of the 2011 census, the municipal unit had a population of 5,115, and the town had a population of 1,438. Originated as a small fisherman's village of Greek immigrants from Asia Minor today Keramoti is a picturesque little sea resort with a faboulous sandy beach,several little hotels and a lot of vacation rentals.

Kavala

Kavala, the capital and main port of the Kavala prefecture is amphitheatrically built on the slopes of Mt. Symvolo forming one of the most picturesque cities in Greece. The city’s breeze sweeps through its historic buildings, which perfectly reflect the city’s modern character.

Neapoli, Chrysoupoli, Kavala: according to archaeological finds, the city’s history dates back to the Prehistoric times. Initially the city’s core was restricted to the district of Panayia, which has been uninterruptedly inhabited since the 7th century BC. After 2500 years though, at the beginning of the 16th century, Kavala expanded maintaining these new borders until 1870; it was only after 1928 that it began to shape its today structure. Its strategic and economic importance over the centuries is attributed to its strategic position in Via Egnatia, which traversed the city connecting East and West, to its port and to the natural fortification of the peninsula, on which the old city was built.

Porto Lagos

Porto Lagos is a small scenic village, which is coastal and lakeside at the same time since next to it is Vistonida lake and its coasts are washed by the Thracian sea. It is located on the northeastern side of the prefecture at the boarders of Xanthi and Rodopi prefectures and is popular with ornithologist, as well as lovers of bird watching as a perfect place for this activity. Among lagoons, valleys, forests and Vistonida lake there is a biotope that hosts a rich bird fauna. In this area you will find 322 bird species. Some of them are little egret, flamingos, pygmy cormorant etc. In the small forest at the entrance of the village and its port, above the dense pine trees three kinds of heron nest: the Grey Heron, the Squacco Heron and the Little Egret.

Myrina

Myrina is a former municipality on the island of Lemnos, North Aegean, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Lemnos, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] It covers the west coast of the island, and has a land area of 82.049 square kilometres (31.679 sq mi),[3] about 17.2% of the island's area. Its municipal seat was the town of Mýrina (pop. 5,107 at the 2001 census), located in the middle of the island's west coast. The town is also the capital of Lemnos, as well as the seat of the Metropolitan (Greek Orthodox bishop) of Lemnos. In addition to the town of Myrina, the municipal unit includes the communities of Káspakas (792), Platý (785), Thános (451), and Kornós (267). The 2011 census recorded 5,711 residents in the town and 8,006 residents in the municipal unit.

Lemnos

A large island totally off the beaten track, Lemnos in Greece surprises visitors with the deserted beaches, the mountainous villages and the interesting archaeological sites. Mythology says that Lemnos was the island where god Hephaestus had his copper workshop. This is why a town called Ifestia was constructed on the island to his honor. Lemnos is a fantastic place for totally private holidays and relaxation. Beaches are vast and have gorgeous sand and crystal water. The eastern side is getting popular among windsurfers.

Salamina

Salamis, is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus and about 16 kilometres (10 miles) west of Athens. The chief city, Salamina, lies in the west-facing core of the crescent on Salamis Bay, which opens into the Saronic Gulf. On the Eastern side of the island is its main port, Paloukia, in size second in Greece only to Piraeus, the port of Athens.

The traditional etymology of Salamis derives it from the eponymous nymph Salamis, the mother of Cychreus, the legendary first king of the island. A more modern theory considers "Salamis" to come from the root sal 'salt' and -amis 'middle'; thus Salamis would be the place amid salt water. Some scholars connect it to the Semitic root Š-L-M 'health, safety, peace', because of the well-sheltered harbor.

Sounion

Cape Sounion is the promontory at the southernmost tip of the Attic peninsula, 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) south of the town of Lavrio (ancient Thoricus), and 70 kilometres (43 mi) southeast of Athens. It is part of Lavreotiki municipality, East Attica, Greece.

Cape Sounion is noted for its Temple of Poseidon, one of the major monuments of the Golden Age of Athens. Its remains are perched on the headland, surrounded on three sides by the sea.

Spetses

Spetses is an affluent island and a municipality in the Islands regional unit, Attica, Greece. It is sometimes included as one of the Saronic Islands. Until 1948, it was part of the old prefecture of Argolidocorinthia, which is now split into Argolis and Corinthia. In ancient times, it was known as Pityoussa, and later as Petses.

The island is now an independent municipality (pop. 4,027), with no internal boundaries within the municipality. The town of Spetses (pop. 4,001 in 2011) is the only large settlement on the island. The other settlements on the island are Moní Agíon Pánton, Ligonéri, Ágioi Anárgyroi ,Kouzoúnos. Also part of the Municipality of Spetses are the islands of Spetsopoula, Falkonera, and Velopoula (all uninhabited). The municipality has an area of 27.121 km2.

Nafplio

Nafplio is a seaport town in the Peloponnese in Greece that has expanded up the hillsides near the north end of the Argolic Gulf. The town was an important seaport held under a succession of royal houses in the Middle Ages as part of the lordship of Argos and Nauplia, held initially by the de la Roche following the Fourth Crusade before coming under the Republic of Venice and, lastly, the Ottoman Empire. The town was the capital of the First Hellenic Republic and of the Kingdom of Greece, from the start of the Greek Revolution in 1821 until 1834. Nafplio is now the capital of the regional unit of Argolis.

Mycenae

Mycenae (Greek: Μυκῆναι Mykēnai or Μυκήνη Mykēnē) is an archaeological site near Mykines in Argolis, north-eastern Peloponnese, Greece. It is located about 90 kilometres (56 miles) south-west of Athens; 11 kilometres (7 miles) north of Argos; and 48 kilometres (30 miles) south of Corinth. The site is 19 kilometres (12 miles) inland from the Saronic Gulf and built upon a hill rising 900 feet above sea level.

In the second millennium BC, Mycenae was one of the major centres of Greek civilization, a military stronghold which dominated much of southern Greece, Crete, the Cyclades and parts of southwest Anatolia. The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in reference to Mycenae. At its peak in 1350 BC, the citadel and lower town had a population of 30,000 and an area of 32 hectares.

Epidaurus

Epidaurus was a small city (polis) in ancient Greece, on the Argolid Peninsula at the Saronic Gulf. Two modern towns bear the name Epidavros (Greek: Επίδαυρος): Palaia Epidavros and Nea Epidavros. Since 2010 they belong to the new municipality of Epidaurus, part of the regional unit of Argolis. The seat of the municipality is the town Lygourio. It is famous with the well preserved antic theater which is the biggest survived in Europe with about 24.000 seats . Nearby is a very good archeological museum .

Hydra

Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the natural springs on the island.

The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (pop. 1948, area 49.6 km2 (19.2 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets, total area 64.443 km2 (24.9 sq mi). The province of Hydra (Greek: Επαρχία Ύδρας) was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006.

Poros

Poros is a small Greek island-pair in the southern part of the Saronic Gulf, about 58 km (36 mi) (31 nautical miles) south from Piraeus and separated from the Peloponnese by a 200 m (656 ft) wide sea channel, with the town of Galatas on the mainland across the strait. Its surface area is about 31 square kilometres (12 sq mi) and it has 3,780 inhabitants. The ancient name of Poros was Pogon. Like other ports in the Saronic, it is a popular weekend destination for Athenian travellers.

Poros consists of two islands: Sphairia (Greek: Σφαιρία, pronounced [sfeˈria]), the southern part, which is of volcanic origin, where today's city is located, and Kalaureia (Greek: Καλαυρία, [kalavˈria]), also Kalavria or Calauria (meaning 'gentle breeze'), the northern and largest part. A bridge connects the two islands over a narrow strait.

Aegina

Aegina is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 27 kilometres (17 miles) from Athens. Tradition derives the name from Aegina the mother of the hero Aeacus, who was born on the island and became its king.During ancient times Aegina was a rival of Athens, the great sea power of the era.

The municipality of Aegina consists of the island of Aegina and a few offshore islets. It is part of the Islands regional unit, Attica region. The municipality is subdivided into the following five communities (population in 2011 in parentheses)